Snoring tops the new “Hate List’ for bedroom annoyances

We all need a good night’s sleep regularly but in a recent nationwide survey in the United Kingdom, snoring topped the list of our most hated bedroom annoyances by a country mile and came top of the list with 54% in the poll taken in this multi-response survey.

Maybe it’s not a lot to ask from a loved one, but sound, restful sleep is incredibly important to our lives in so many ways, and we seemingly fail to make it possible for each other. Millions of people in Britain are losing vital hours of good sleep because their partner is disturbing their sleep.

To put it in perspective, an adult needs to get at least 8 hours restful and undisturbed sleep each night for their mind and their body to perform at their best the next day. This is not happening.

A whopping 74% claim that they lose at least one hour’s sleep per night and that’s the same as going one night each week without going to bed at all.

Snoring causes arguments

One fact is new – and that is that we are owning up to snoring at last, whereas we either used to dismiss it altogether or simply regard it as a joke. The same survey showed that 44% of us owned up to snoring.

There are other reasons too for these disturbed nights, as well as snoring, but this was by far the leading ‘annoyance’ with couples, and many of these bad habits seem to be turning our bedrooms into battlefields.

Leading the way in the table of hates and dislikes were these:

Snoring 54%

Hogging the duvet 46%

Sleeping naked 41%

Restless fidgeting 40%

Stealing partner’s space 36%

Passing wind 34%

Bad Breath 27%

Sweating 26%

Allowing pets into bed 17%

Sleep Talking 17%

Most of these problems can of course be solved – including snoring.

Bedtime however was considered important, and more than half of the couples that were interviewed stated that they enjoyed quality time in bed with their partner, with pillow talk playing an important role for some 59%, particularly those with children. It gave them time to discuss family matters, plans, future holidays, and of course the dreaded subject of in-laws.

So despite the warfare, it’s a good opportunity for couples to bond and take key decisions together as long as the overall conditions are right for a good night’s sleep.

We should maybe focus on the annoyances and eliminate them – after all it’s so easy to do that, and the overall results could be so beneficial to both marital life and future health.


STOP SNORING WEEK • Day 1

The bedroom battleground: Four in ten snorers argue with their partner over the noise while a quarter don’t even share a bed.

The latest figures show that around a quarter of women and four in ten men are frequent snorers, although nearly half of all people snore occasionally.

A new survey of 1,134 snorers and their partners, conducted to mark National Stop Snoring Week, found that 27 per cent of people are regularly left feeling grouchy, 21 per cent constantly feel tired, and 16 per cent are less productive as a result of snoring.

More than a half of respondents said they had never tried anything to tackle the problem.

 Some 41% of snorers engage in regular night-time tussles with partners

 More than half of people have never tried anything to tackle the problem

 Around one quarter of women and four in ten men are frequent snorers

Bedtime should be a blissful part of any happy couple’s day and the bedroom a safe haven where partners snuggle up before drifting into a peaceful night’s sleep.However, for many couples, it has become a battleground and the site of a nightly war with a single cause: SNORING.

A new study has found that 41 per cent of snorers engage in regular nightly disagreements with their partners. They are usually woken up by an annoying whistle, wheeze or snort and the annoyed party will attempt to shift their partner from on their back onto their side to help ease the noise. Others find even a shove or dig in the ribs does not work and so 28 per cent regularly resort to sleeping in another room to get some sleep.

Snoring can be caused by a number of factors.

Dr Chris Idzikowski, Director of the Edinburgh Sleep Centre, said: ‘Snoring can greatly impact sleep quality which may eventually lead to more serious health problems.

‘To ensure couples maintain the intimacy of their relationship and prevent snoring from getting in the way of a good night’s sleep, it is important that both the snorer and the partner work together to find a solution.

‘If you or your partner snore then there’s a variety of simple things you can do to manage the condition such as sleeping on your front or side, maintaining a healthy weight and avoiding alcohol late at night.

‘While there is no cure for snoring, it can be controlled so it may also be worth discussing options such as mouth guards.’
By John Redfern


Stop snoring, start sleeping!

‘National Stop Snoring Week’ 22-26 April 2013

If snoring or sleep problems are causing you or your partner sleepless nights, then it’s time to take steps to solve the problem. Every recent research project has recently confirmed and warned about the serious dangers to your health if you snore heavily – including diabetes, dangerous fatigue, cardiovascular problems and strokes – sometimes resulting in death In addition, we all know the damaging effect it can have on a relationship.

Snoring is no longer a Music Hall joke, and it is certainly not restricted to men as was always thought. Recent figures have shown that many women also snore and have gone in rapidly increasing numbers to search for cures with their Doctors, dentists, and specialist Sleep centres.

There are a number of other major contributory factors that include alcohol, smoking, obesity and other lifestyle-related behaviour including the poor sleep levels due to the technology constantly employed today.

Our children too are suffering – literally – from the problem of snoring. Numerous reports attribute many serious child behavioural problems to the resultant lack of sleep because of snoring, and serious fatigue levels during school that impair their learning facility. Again, late night technology, a major part of today’s youth culture, relates closely to serious sleep disorders.

It’s time to act – and the media during Stop Snoring Week will tell us daily.

If you, or your partner, snore heavily, disturbing the peace at night, then make sure you do something about it – and don’t delay. There are proven simple solutions that are easy to obtain and NHS Approved.

The SleepPro dental mouthpiece is a leading product range that has been specially designed to fight snoring and end this serious problem – immediately. It was designed and is manufactured to a style developed through consultation between British Doctors and Dentists. Not only is the product NHS Recommended, but is also easily accessible, inexpensive, produces rapid results, and has a 98% overall success rate.

So make sure to look at the range of products on offer that include the Standard mouthpiece, a version that is self-fit for comfort, and their ultimate product, the Custom, that is tailor made to fit you in a matter of days.

SleepPro products are at the leading edge of Oral Appliance Technology and a programme of constant research, product development and improvement ensures that they stay ahead of the rest in preventing this serious health-related danger.

Make sure you act immediately if you snore – either for yourself or on behalf of your partner. If the problem is really serious then don’t hesitate to consult your GP because you could be preventing major health problems later – or even saving a life.

By John Redfern