Some snoring is harmful and some isn’t – and this is how to tell the difference

Not all snoring is harmful so it helps to be able to recognise when it’s actually dangerous as it can sometimes cause a very serious lack of oxygen and life threatening sleep disorders. Over one third of the people who snore are believed to have obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA).

OSA Diagram

Overall it is estimated that 60% of men and 40% of women snore by the time they have reached their sixties and if they have OSA, then the primary sleep apnoea symptoms are pauses in breathing during sleep. They’re related to snoring and the resulting lack of oxygen to the brain during sleep.

Not all snoring however is connected to sleep apnoea. Loud breathing noises or ‘snoring’ can be described as a normal event. However sleeping with your mouth open and pauses in breathing may indicate a sleep disorder. If you sleep on your back, your tongue falls into your airway, and pauses in breathing can reach a duration of 10 seconds, and happen as many as 100 times in an hour.

The reason for your snoring stems from the relaxation of the throat muscles when you sleep. Less airway volume can mean that the relaxed throat vibrates when you breathe and this is the universal cause of snoring whether it’s harmful as described above or just ‘normal’ snoring.

In addition to snoring, other symptoms of OSA include:

  • Gasping for air whilst sleeping
  • Waking up with Morning headaches
  • Feeling extra tired during the day
  • Increased blood pressure
  • Irritability or mood swings

For optimal breathing, we should be breathing through our nose. Sleep apnoea is your body experiencing breathing dysfunction during sleep. Nasal breathing prevents oxygen deprivation and it acts to increase blood flow and deliver oxygen to the lungs.

The tongue is one of the main factors in snoring and sleeping with the mouth open. It can also reveal sleep apnoea symptoms. Your tongue contains and connects to one of the largest groups of muscles in the body and the muscles of the tongue support the airways with connections to the jaws, neck, and base of the skull. It also connects to the hyoid bone, which is a floating bone that supports your airway.

When you go to sleep, the primary muscles inside your tongue and your throat relax and for you to keep your airway open, support muscles for the throat must hold firm. The normal posture of the tongue is to sit against the top of your mouth. This position turns on the muscles that support the throat and the airways.

Sleeping with an open mouth is a sign your tongue is not supporting your airway. The tongue can then fall back into the airway, blocking normal breathing. Mouth breathing can also cause lack of oxygen and OSA.

Sleep disorders have become a bigger problem than ever and this was underlined this week by the NHS figures which reveal that the number of tests carried out by the NHS to diagnose people with sleep disorders across England has doubled in the past decade.

NHS data shows that 147,610 sleep diagnostic tests were carried out last year – compared with 69,919 in 2007-08. This is more than double.

Those with OSA usually manage it by either CPAP treatment, which involves wearing an oxygen mask at night, or by using custom-fitted oral devices that keep the airways open. It also helps to lose weight and in some more extreme cases people can have surgery to remove excess throat tissue.

Doctors attribute the rise in the number of sleep tests to a greater sense of overall public awareness about the wider health implications of not getting enough sleep. It is estimated that about 1.5 million people in the UK suffer from the condition, although doctors warn many people will have never been formally diagnosed.

“Sleep apnoea is a serious condition leading to other problems such as high blood pressure, which in turn can lead to strokes and heart attacks,” said Dr Stephen Bianchi from Sheffield’s Northern General Hospital. “We think about 2% of females, and 4% of males in the UK have significant sleep apnoea. We also suspect that 80% of those with the condition are unaware they have it.”

John Redfern


Poor Quality Sleep is costing Business time and money

Employees’ sleep problems are probably costing British business a great deal of time and money as poor-quality sleep can affect workers’ mood and judgment and it can also result in serious health problems. Ask yourself if you lost a day or two of work last year because of poor-quality sleep the night before? If that’s the case you’re far from alone, according to new results from the World Sleep Survey.

Tired office worker suffering from poor quality sleep

The study, which was conducted by researchers at the University of Oxford found that full-time employees lose an average of seven days of work per year due to poor-quality sleep and those who report that their sleep is of “less than average” quality lose more than 13 days. More than 20,000 people participated in the survey. The financial cost of that to the UK is huge.

Earlier research from 2011 prompted employers to take a closer look at sleep. Researchers from Harvard University had interviewed more than 7,000 people by phone, and found that insomnia/poor quality sleep results in the loss of 11 days of work per year. As a nation, that represented a total loss of $63.2 billion.

Poor-quality sleep can result can affect mood and judgment, and result in serious health problems. In the USA, the Centres for Disease Control and Prevention recently declared insufficient sleep a “public health epidemic,” with some 18 million people in the U.S. reporting that sleep troubles impacted their job performance.

Sleep experts are not surprised that exhausted employees are skipping work. When you don’t sleep well, you’ll experience a serious degree of cognitive impairment. Some people simply don’t allot enough time for a good night’s rest; others aren’t able to sleep well due to medical conditions, like insomnia or sleep apnoea.

For those who have persistent sleep troubles, it is recommended that they either pay a visit to a doctor or if they persistently snore heavily, or at least try using an oral appliance to reduce the problem and prevent it. Some 72% of those who participated in the World Sleep Survey said they had not consulted a physician about their sleep troubles.

People who average less than seven hours sleep per night are at increased risk of problems, such as high blood pressure, depression and anxiety. This occurs even in people who don’t feel tired during the day. Others may have sleep apnoea but be totally unaware although their partner may realise by identifying the symptoms of heavy snoring, appearing to wake often throughout the night and gasping for breath.

Figures published by the AA attribute as many as 20% of accidents, many involving death, to poor quality sleep by a driver who then dozes at the wheel.

It is now more widely accepted as a major problem and some companies are trying to help their employees become more aware of the difficulties it causes. Historically, employer wellness programs have focused on fitness and healthy eating. But that’s now beginning to change.

Some companies are developing programs to assess and treat employees with sleep apnoea, a common disorder that disrupts sleep and often goes undiagnosed. More than 5% of UK male adults have sleep apnoea and there are lower but increasing figures for women, often due to weight gain. The real figures may be even higher as most cases are undiagnosed.

Large US companies, like Google and Goldman Sachs, have brought in sleep experts to disseminate information about sleep disorders. Johnson & Johnson offers its employees a digital coaching program that is designed to reduce insomnia, and involves relaxation videos. Corporate wellness companies even offer coaches to teach employees about healthy habits for getting a good night’s rest.

One of the key recommendations for improving sleep by stopping heavy snoring, and controlling sleep apnoea, is by the use of a medically approved mouthpiece that is worn at night, and is much like a sports gumshield that we are all familiar with. In this case it protects in a different way by moving the jaw forward slightly, and in doing so it keeps the throat open so that breathing continues normally. Results from the specialist NHS sleep researchers at Papworth Hospital tested a selection of typical oral appliances, and based on the results recommended SleepPro Custom as the first mouthpiece to use to prevent snoring and control sleep apnoea.

The subsequent result of using these simple and inexpensive oral appliances will improve worker efficiency and safety in many ways, as well as improving their attendance record, and benefit their general well-being both in the long and the short term.

 

John Redfern


New Guidelines for treating Obstructive Sleep Apnoea (OSA)

If you already suffer from sleep apnoea, or think that you or your partner may have this dangerous problem, and it remains undiagnosed for whatever reason, then the new rules that have been issued in the United States will have some real meaning for you.

The American College of Physicians (ACP) has published new clinical practice guidelines regarding the management and treatment of OSA in adults. It deals with the known detrimental effects of the problem, and discusses the limitations of the various available treatments. These findings endorse those of the AASM – the American Academy of Sleep Medicine but take recommendations further.

As ever, the USA is ahead of the UK in dealing with this huge problem, partly because it is so much more widespread in the community there. Much of this can be linked to obesity, a major problem in the USA, and which is rapidly becoming so here due to changes in our diet, lower exercise levels in youth, and sedentary occupations now being the largest group by far versus manual workers. Alcohol also often plays a significant role in the equation – mostly due to the high calorific intake and the effect that alcohol can have on sleep hygiene.

What is OSA?

OSA disrupts breathing during sleep, and this is usually as a result of the muscles and soft tissues in the throat relaxing and collapsing to block the airway. It can last for about 10 seconds or even more. It affects people of all ages, but particularly those of us in middle age, and particularly the elderly.

However, we believe that around 80% of cases remain undiagnosed. OSA is easy to treat but when left undiagnosed and untreated, is linked with a range of serious health concerns that include heart disease and stroke, diabetes and high blood pressure, called hypertension. Fatigue becomes a huge problem too.

Current approved treatments for OSA and sleep disordered breathing

OSA is a chronic medical disorder that requires immediate action, but also requires long term, and often lifelong. therapy. Obviously a healthier lifestyle will come high on the list from any GP but this will not stop the problem of your snoring immediately, and sometimes does not succeed at all.

As well as recommending weight loss in overweight and obese patients, it recommends and approves the following treatments as it is recognised that weight-loss intervention alone will not achieve the desired objectives.

Medical Treatments and Clinical Recommendations for OSA

CPAP Mask wearer

  • Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) is recommended for more serious sufferers but it is readily identified that many patients reject this treatment for various reasons, particularly having to wear a mask for such long periods of time, claustrophobia, having a dry mouth, or the associated discomfort of the mask amongst others.
  • It is still however strongly recommended for chronic sufferers if acceptable.

Sweet dreams

  • Mandibular Advancement Devices (MAD’s or Splints) are fully recommended as a primary treatment route and a strong option in many cases versus CPAP. They are more readily accepted than masks and have many distinct advantages over them including, ease of wear, instant results, high rates of effectiveness and also being inexpensive by comparison – even bespoke mouthpieces or the now available self-fit versions which are highly adjustable compared to the standard oral appliance – although this may be the best starting point.
  • Strongly recommended by ACP for less severe versions of OSA.

Snoring Surgery

  • Surgery however is not listed in the ACP’s summarized recommendations, but the guideline does specifically discuss its role as a treatment for OSA. It highlights that surgical procedures, which are intended for sleep-disordered breathing, are not as effective as either CPAP or using MAD’s. Currently success rates vary greatly and can be as low as 20%, as well as it sometimes requiring several procedures.
  • Not currently recommended by ACP to American Physicians.

More and more clinics, doctors and hospitals in the USA now recommend using oral appliance technology in the form of a mouthpiece to be used when sleeping and this is now becoming more accepted as a route here in the UK, particularly now that higher quality MAD’s are NHS Approved.

By John Redfern

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Snoring mothers-to-be are linked to low birth weight babies

The British Press have covered this subject extensively this week based on the results of a new research study that has just been completed in the United States. The research was published in the journal ‘Sleep’.

Snoring can be more than just an annoyance to others who are trying to sleep in the same room. For pregnant women, snoring could indicate certain higher risks. Experts say that snoring may be a sign of breathing problems that could deprive an unborn baby of oxygen.

Snoring is often a key sign of obstructive sleep apnoea, which results in the airway becoming partially blocked, said the researchers, whose findings appear in the journal Sleep. This can reduce blood oxygen levels during the night and is associated with serious health problems, including high blood pressure and heart attacks. The experts stress sleep apnoea can of course be easily treated.

The study found that chronic snorers, who snored both before and during pregnancy, were two thirds more likely to have a baby whose weight was in the bottom 10%.

Newborn baby girl sleeping

They were also more than twice as likely to need an elective Caesarean delivery, or C-section, compared with non-snorers.

Dr Louise O’Brien, from the University of Michigan’s Sleep Disorders Centre, said: “There has been great interest in the implications of snoring during pregnancy and how it affects maternal health but there is little data on how it may impact the health of the baby.

“We’ve found that chronic snoring is associated with both smaller babies and C-sections, even after we accounted for other risk factors. This suggests that we have a window of opportunity to screen pregnant women for breathing problems during sleep that may put them at risk of poor delivery outcomes.”

Previous research has already shown that women who start to snore during pregnancy are at risk from high blood pressure and the potentially dangerous pregnancy condition pre-eclampsia.

More than a third of the 1,673 pregnant women recruited for the new US study reported habitual snoring. They were also more than twice as likely to need an elective Caesarean delivery, or C-section, compared with non-snorers.

Scientists found that women who snored in their sleep three or more nights per week had a higher risk of poor delivery outcomes, including smaller babies and Caesarean births.

The very worst cases of sleep apnoea can be treated with CPAP (continuous positive airway pressure), which involves wearing a mask attached to a machine during sleep, which pumps oxygen to keep the airways open. Most other forms of sleep apnoea can be treated with the wearing of a simple snoring mouthpiece, similar to a gumshield that is worn for sports.

Dr O’Brien added: “If we can identify risks during pregnancy that can be treated, such as obstructive sleep apnoea, we can reduce the incidence of small babies, C-sections and possibly NICU (neo-natal intensive care unit) admission that not only improve long-term health benefits for the newly born but also help keep costs down.”

By John Redfern


Snoring can cause Women to put on weight

Lack of sleep affects food choices and if you don’t sleep well it can cause you to choose more high-calorie foods. So, not only does being overweight cause you to snore, it would appear that snoring causes you to gain weight too.

It’s obviously normal for a poor night’s sleep to affect you the next day and make you feel tired; if it’s a constant problem then it could have some wide-ranging effects on your health.

Several studies have suggested that a lack of sleep can increase the chance of weight gain and obesity. It may be that a lack of sleep affects hormones that help control our appetite, that people eat more calories to make up for the tiring effects of lost sleep, or that people who stay up late tend to sleep less overall and eat more calories during their extended waking hours.

Snoring and Weight gain

However, these are mostly theories, as few good-quality studies have explored the link between sleep, eating, and weight gain. To help fill this gap in what we know, researchers recruited 225 healthy, non-obese people (aged 22 to 50 years old) to live in a sleep laboratory for 12 to 18 days.

They randomly selected participants to have five nights of either:
Restricted sleep, with four hours in bed, from 4 a.m. to 8 a.m., or
Unrestricted sleep, with 10 hours in bed, from 10 p.m. to 8 a.m.

During the day, people had regular meals and could also eat at other times, as food was always available in the kitchen. What food they ate and their weight were closely monitored, so the researchers could compare the two groups to see whether restricted sleep increased the chance of weight gain.

What did we learn?
People who had restricted sleep consumed more calories than those who had unrestricted sleep.
All of the extra calories – around 550 per day on average – were from food consumed between 10 p.m. and 4 a.m.
When eating late at night, people also got more of their calories from higher fat foods than at other times of the day.
On average, people with restricted sleep gained nearly a kilo of weight, while those with unrestricted sleep gained only one-tenth of a kilogram.

How reliable is the research?
This was a good-quality study. However, it’s worth noting it only included people who were healthy, fairly young, and not obese. So it’s not clear whether these findings will definitely apply to other groups of people. Also, the participants weren’t able to exercise during the study and might not have had access to all the foods they usually ate. These things might have had an effect on the findings.

What does this mean for me?
It provides good evidence that restricted sleep can increase how many calories you eat and leads to weight gain, at least in the short term. If you tend to stay up late and/or get little sleep, it may be especially pertinent to you as after 10 p.m. was when people typically got their extra calories, rather than during the day.

By John Redfern


Snoring, sleep apnoea, and sleep loss in women

Snoring, and sleep apnoea in particular, were both generally considered to be conditions predominantly affecting men but we now know this not to be the case, with the ration of men to women estimated at approximately 2:1. Since sleep apnoea is mainly a problem that is self-reported , men were more likely to seek help for this and heavy snoring, even if prompted to do so by their partner.

Approximately 50% of women snorers are believed not to report their symptoms to their GP, mostly due to being embarrassed. Some studies show that as many as 90% of more severe cases go undiagnosed in women, and women have a tendency not to report apnoea events, choking or restless sleep, whereas most men did report these matters.

Treatment however can be both simple and inexpensive and it can prevent major health problems in later life. Sufferers are often put off by the thought that the treatment most used historically was CPAP, where air is forced via a mask into the lungs throughout the whole night. More recent thinking is to recommend the use of an oral appliance for mild and moderate cases of sleep apnoea.

Sleep apnea in womenComparison showing Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP and an Oral Appliance (MAD)

The contrast is shown in the photography above where one patient is using a mask

for CPAP and the other an oral appliance – just distinguishable in the inset, with the result that this method is now much more appealing to those who suffer – both men and women. This treatment, although not quite so effective, works very well.

Snoring often results in a disturbed night and it is very common to hear a comment such as – “I barely slept last night. I just couldn’t get comfortable” – or – “I tried to fall asleep, but my mind kept racing.”

Sleep, and the lack of it, is a common talking point, and disturbed sleep generally is much more common in women than men. A woman’s experience of sleep loss is different and sometimes feminine factors are involved that may cause and maintain sleep difficulties. However, focusing on quality sleep is important to help prevent many aspects of both physical and mental health.

Disruption of sleep leads not only to daytime sleepiness, but memory lapses, weight gain, headaches, irritability and poor work performance overall. It can also contribute to psychological disorders such as depression and for the more severe cases, there’s an increased risk of high blood pressure, premature heart disease and stroke.

It’s not an area to neglect.

The best solution is an approach on several fronts including exercise, reduced alcohol consumption, healthy eating and treatment for the sleep apnoea or heavy snoring which will stop the snoring immediately whilst other things take time.

There are several treatment solutions including surgery, CPAP (Continuous Positive Airways Pressure) a full-face mask which works by stopping the airways from collapsing, or a mandibular advancement device, like a sports mouth-guard, that holds the lower jaw slightly forward, making more space to breathe.

Many women now opt for the mouthpiece. It’s easy to wear, quite comfortable, non-claustrophobic unlike the mask, and doesn’t create dryness of the mouth, which CPAP has a tendency to do. Mouthpieces are easily acquired as they are non-prescription, but some are NHS Approved, which is preferable, and they will bring you immediate results.

SleepPro now have a special product in their range dedicated to women only – the only oral appliance technology company to do so.

By John Redfern


Massive increases recorded in the number of women who snore

Women in particular do not like to think they snore – there’s a stigma attached to it – yet they now account for 40 per cent of snorers,” says Dr Martin Allen, who is a consultant physician at the University Hospital of North Staffordshire, and a spokesperson for the British Lung Foundation.

Snoring damages health

Previously considered by many to be a predominantly male domain, it is now women who account for almost half of the snoring problem in the UK. There is no denying that it is predominantly their changed lifestyle that has caused the problem, and again there is massive proof to support this. Latest figures show that women are seeking to resolve it however, and are dealing with it in a number of ways, dependent upon the problem’s severity.

Clinics are now advising 10 times more women snorers than 2 years ago – and the problem is conclusively a result of drinking, smoking, and weight gain. As well as the health problems previously mentioned, fatigue and irritability are also often a major result of having that disturbed night’s rest.

As we are all aware, stopping smoking is difficult, even in Stoptober, drinking tends to be an important part of all our social lives, and losing those extra pounds is harder work still, which can often necessitate lots of time and expense at the Gym in the early morning or after a busy day – which is not always convenient.

The majority of women snorers can stop snoring immediately through the use of a simple oral appliance that has previously been targeted at men alone; it’s fast, unobtrusive, and inexpensive. It’s a simple mouthpiece that helps to keep the airway open at night when asleep. No prescription is required and some products in the UK already have NHS Approval Status having been tried and tested for many years. It’s both fast and effective and it can stop your snoring whilst you’re working hard correcting those other lifestyle issues.

SleepPro are the leading British company in this field and their oral appliances are recommended by Clinics, Doctors, and Dentists throughout the world. As well as having full NHS Approval they have a recorded 98% success rate for product effectiveness, which at the end of the day is what counts most.

To meet this new and rising demand from women they have now taken it further and are the first to produce a specially produced mouthpiece for women that has now become available land was launched just this week.

Look for new SleepPro Woman – it’s pink, not the traditional male blue, and in the early sales period, there’s a pound donation from every sale going to support the vital research carried out by the Breast Cancer Campaign – appropriately named #wearitpink.

By John Redfern


STOP SNORING WEEK • Day 4

Children’s Health • Snoring – What Mothers really need to know.

Snoring in children can range from a gentle little noise every now and then, to a loud snore every night. At a worrying time like this, with Measles topping the headlines as a health danger for children, parents need to better understand what snoring is and whether or not it is a problem for their child.

What Is Snoring?
Snoring is the sound of the upper-airway passage vibrating with effort to let air pass through. The louder and more chronic and constant the snore is, the more likely it is that the upper airway is not only floppy, but perhaps not staying ‘open’ enough for air to get through during sleep.

When the upper airway closes fully during sleep, this is called obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). If this occurs, the air, and therefore the oxygen, will stop flowing through the body for a short while and the child will appear to stop breathing. After a few seconds, the body will react to the lack of oxygen, and the child will take a deep breath, gasp and then settle back into a normal breathing and sleeping pattern until the next time the flow of oxygen stops.

Sometimes this upper-airway obstruction is only partial and is called Hypopnea Syndrome (HS). This is not as severe as OSA, but still needs attention in children because even small amounts of upper-airway collapsibility can indicate problems with overnight breathing.

However, not all snoring is due to OSA or HS. Primary snoring is snoring that does not involve upper-airway closure or blood-oxygen reduction. Many children have occasional primary snoring, particularly between the ages of two and four, or when they have a cold or allergy.

If the snoring is chronic, and is not related to a cold or an allergy, then it is worth investigating because research suggests primary snoring (even without oxygen changes or gasping for breath) still disrupts sleep.

What Impact Does Snoring Have On Children?
Snoring children will have constantly disrupted and poor-quality sleep. They are more likely to have nightmares and night terrors, and be restless. It is thought that snoring children are hot and sweaty due to difficulty regulating their body temperature and/or because they move around a lot.

Snoring, particularly when it is associated with OSA or HS, can also have an impact on daytime performance, the same as it does with adults, including reduced attention and memory performance, and problem-solving skills, which can affect learning and schoolwork. Snoring, poor sleep and OSA can also increase the likelihood of weight gain.

What Causes Snoring?
As noted above, snoring is caused mainly by a floppy upper airway, but other factors can play a role in this. They are:
1.    Jaw or nose shape
2.    Age: children between two and four are more likely to snore 3.    Allergies and colds
4.    Obesity
5.    Large tonsils and/or adenoids

How Prevalent Is Snoring In Children?
Snoring is common between the ages of two and four, and up to 30 per cent of children will snore during that age range and not snore again. But in general, 15 per cent of children will suffer from primary snoring more than three times per week, and about two per cent of those children will have OSAS or HS.

To begin to investigate your child’s snoring, speak to your GP who will refer you to the appropriate health professional if there is a problem.

Treatment Options Available
The treatments for snoring are aimed at trying to get the air to move freely through the upper airway during sleep and the cause of the snore will dictate the treatment. Most symptomatic snoring is usually treated in children over two years of age with an operation to take out enlarged tonsils or adenoids.

Sometimes there is a need for additional treatments to clear the nose with sprays and medications, or surgery. One possibility for resistant OSA is the continuous positive airways pressure (CPAP) machine. This is a ventolin mask worn over the nose and mouth during sleep that keeps the airways open by diverting air down through the airway during sleep.

This machine, while very effective, is often difficult for children to wear – and even adults reject it as a route. Very few children will need treatment such as the CPAP machine for sleep apnoea for the rest of their lives.

Do Children Outgrow Snoring?
Snoring generally resolves itself, either with age or intervention. In fact, there is still a lot of research needed to help us to get the best treatments for snoring that will ensure children will remain healthy throughout their lives.

Snoring does not necessarily indicate a problem, but if your child does snore, even when they do not have a cold, parents should be vigilant for any problems.
By John Redfern


Heavy Snoring & Sleep Apnea

There is a difference between regular, habitual snoring and sleep apnea. Not all snorers will suffer from sleep apena but it can be a symptom, particularly for the louder snorers among us.

What is Sleep Apnea?

Sleep Apnea is a sleeping disorder characterized by abnormal pauses in breathing or a low intake of oxygen during sleep. Each pause is called an ‘apnea’ which can last anywhere from 10 seconds to a couple of minutes in severe cases.

The gaps in breathing can often occur dozens of times within an hour of sleep. The most common form of apnea is obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) which occurs because of a physical blockage in the throat or nasal passages. This makes snoring a common feature of sleep apnea, as the soft tissue in your throat causes a blockage that prevents oxygen passing freely.

Often the sufferer of the disorder is unaware of the disorder, so it’s often pointed out by a member of the family or sleeping partner.

So if you are heavy snorer it’s worth taking note, that this in turn could be a symptom of sleep apnea. The reason for concern is that sleep apnea is a potentially dangerous disorder causing high blood pressure, cardiovascular problems and even stroke.

If you have a reputation around your house as a noisy snorer it’s worth asking others to look out for the condition if you haven’t spotted it already, look out for pauses in breath intake followed by a gagging or choking sound, often the sleeper inadvertently wakes up without knowing what has transpired.

Treating the problem

The majority of moderate sleep apnea cases can be treated with a stop snoring device, by using one of these devices you can dramatically improve your sleep quality. However in severe cases we do recommend consulting a medical professional first, one of the most highly recommended methods is the continuous positive airway pressure machine (CPAP) which clears the patient’s airway during sleep by pushing pressurized air through the throat.

Sleep Apnea is a serious condition, that may require medical advice sooner rather than later.


Join our Partners Against Snoring group!

Are one of the many long suffering snoring partners looking to vent their frustrations?

SleepPro have set up a group for your convenience, let your feelings known if your partner is keeping you up at night (for the wrong reasons).

Let your feelings known, name and shame your partner or even post a video demonstrating just how horrible snoring can be.

We think that partners deserve a place to vent their frustration so we have set up a Google plus community for anyone looking to let their feelings known or looking to gain some of the best advice on how to stop snoring and how to improve your sleeping pattern.

PAS

All you have to do is sign up at http://bit.ly/16czGon share your information, share your thoughts and troubles, in turn we’ll share some of our most helpful tips to help cut out the snoring.
By Richard Owen