The Top Ten Problems linked to Snoring

Current research studies around the world emphatically link heavy snoring and sleep apnoea to a very long list of dangers to your personal health, as well as numerous other significant problems that can be caused for you both at work or at home.

Most people ignore snoring and it remains dangerously undiagnosed and untreated. If you snore, think about taking some steps to resolve it – it’s fast, inexpensive, and easy to do so.

1. High Blood Pressure

High blood pressure is significantly more likely to develop within patients suffering from sleep apnoea. Blood oxygen levels are lowered significantly during sleep apnoea periods and that creates an excess strain on the blood pressure and heart as it attempts to provide the oxygen required. The worse the sleep apnoea, the more likely someone is to develop hypertension.

2. Strokes and Heart attacks

The development of high blood pressure also increases the likelihood of developing further heart problems like strokes and heart attacks. It can even lead to sudden death from cardiovascular failure. The blood oxygen levels are lowered significantly during sleep apnoea periods. Sleep apnoea can also lead to other heart problems including abnormal heart rhythms like atrial fibrillation.

3. Cancer

Snorers who sleep more than nine hours a night are twice as likely to develop bowel cancer than snorers who get seven hours of sleep a night, according to new research. The study showed a significant link between long periods of sleep and the development of colorectal cancer, especially among people who are overweight or who snore. This is because people with sleep apnoea snore heavily and tend to sleep for longer, because their sleep is disrupted making them more tired.

4. Diabetes

It has been established for a number of years that very heavy snorers or those with sleep apnoea are nine times more likely to have diabetes than those who do not have the disorder. Treating the snoring and problem of lack of good sleep on a regular basis can often reduce blood glucose levels, which would obviously have clear benefits for those with diabetes.

5. Alzheimer’s disease

Sleep apnea, which robs sufferers of deep sleep by endlessly and subconsciously waking them up, becomes more common as people age. Now, a small new study raises the possibility that it may somehow cause — or be caused by — Alzheimer’s disease. The research is preliminary, and it’s possible that there may be no connection between the two conditions. Still, scientists found that seniors with signs of disrupted breathing during sleep were much more likely to have the key indicators of developing Alzheimer’s disease and underlining a link between sleep, aging and memory.

6. Chronic Headaches

A study reveals that people who have chronic daily headache are also likely to be chronic snorers. Chronic daily headache is defined as having at least 15 headaches a month (not necessarily every day), and is a distressing and disabling condition, which can be hard to treat. Researchers at the National Institute on Ageing, believe they have new insight into this condition. It’s not clear whether headaches cause snoring, or whether snoring leads to headache. If the latter turns out to be the case, then curing the snoring – which is perfectly feasible – might also cure the headache.

7. Tiredness, Irritability & Behavioural Problems

People who snore heavily and suffer from disturbed sleep patterns may experience tiredness throughout their whole day and that can lead to emotional issues like irritability. It can lead to focus problems too. Some people might even fall asleep while working – or even driving. Children who suffer may also have poor performance in school. Their typical development may be strained and it can also lead to major behavioural problems.

8. Dangerous Situations

When a person doesn’t get the correct amount of sleep at night their body will insist upon receiving sleep at some point. Excessive daytime sleepiness can lead to falling sleep while driving or operating machinery. People that are suffering from obstructive sleep apnoea, that is left severe and untreated, are 15 times more likely to get into a car crash. Until you are treated for your heavy snoring you need to be sure that it’s safe.#

9. Relationship issues

Loud snoring can disturb more than just the sleep of your partner. It is well known that relationship problems can occur and that loud snoring causes couples to often sleep apart. It is also the third highest cause of divorce. It can also cause irritability and mood swings – both at home and in your work relationships with your colleagues.

10. Asthma

Asthma, especially childhood asthma, may lead to sleep apnoea later on in life and is more common among asthmatics. However whether asthma promotes development of OSA remains unknown, according to recent studies. Some studies have suggested that people with asthma could be at an increased risk for sleep apnoea and that heavy snoring worsens asthma. For each 5-year increment in duration of asthma, research showed that the likelihood of a person developing OSA shows an increase of 12%.

By John Redfern


Important things that you may not know about Snoring

A long day spent at work or home with the kids can leave you desperately longing for a good night’s rest. For chronic snorers and their bedfellows, though, falling and staying asleep isn’t so simple. In fact, what could seem like a harmless annoyance can have surprising consequences that extend beyond bedtime. Luckily, sleep experts like SleepPro know what causes snoring and how to put an end to it.

Read on for the key facts on the connection of snoring to our everyday life – and how to get rid of it from yours.

1. It can complicate a couple’s relationship

That recent argument with your spouse could be a result of sleep deprivation from his or perhaps your snoring. The National Sleep Foundation found that more than one-third of respondents felt their partner’s sleep disorder caused relationship problems. “Severe snoring markedly disturbs the partner’s sleep, causing irritability, anger and depression.”

Talk to the guy keeping you awake at night. Calmly express concern not just for your wellbeing but also his. And if you’re the culprit, don’t write off your loved one’s worries.

2. It may signal other health problems

Do you or your hubby make loud gasping sounds while you sleep? It could be sleep apnoea, a disorder in which breathing stops and starts repeatedly at night, which is connected to heart disease, hypertension and diabetes, especially when undiagnosed. Even without sleep apnoea, a snorer could have an elevated stroke risk, according to new research from the USA.

If you snore and experience daytime sleepiness and memory problems make sure that you see a doctor.

3. Being overweight has been tied to increased snoring

As you gain weight, the muscles inside your neck get thicker, narrowing the airway, As the airway closes, the tissues become more likely to vibrate against one another, causing that dreaded sound.

Shedding 10% of your body weight could drastically improve the situation, and losing just 10 pounds can really help you.

4. What you consume before bed can make snoring worse

Head home from happy hour at least four hours before you hit the hay. Alcohol relaxes the central nervous system, forcing our bodies to work harder to breathe during sleep. When all the tissue and muscle around a throat relaxes, there’s a greater chance for airway collapse.

More things to avoid at bedtime: sleeping pills and other medications that are known to cause muscle relaxation – and either heavy or very spicy meals, particularly if you have acid reflux, since they can flare up irritating fluid in the throat.

5. Your allergies may be a trigger

Breathing in allergens, like pollen and pet dander, sets off swelling in your nose and throat tissues. As the tissues come under increased contact, the airway is likely to close, especially at bedtime. Our body’s ability to compensate for allergens while we’re sleeping is not the same as when we’re awake.

Thankfully, clearing up allergies is easy, from using a prescribed steroid nasal spray to non-sedating antihistamines to allergy shots.

6. Smoking can make matters worse

Yet another reason to kick butt: a study found that past and current smokers are more likely to snore regularly than non-smokers. Cigarette smoke is a hot irritant, which causes swelling of the soft tissues. Because smokers are prone to a raised level of throat inflammation and dryness, their chances are higher for tissue vibration and eventual airway collapse at night.

It’s smart to avoid smoking before bed, but it’s best to quit altogether.

7. Simple sleep tricks could make a difference

Try sleeping on your side or instead raising the head of your bed by from four to eight inches. This can counteract gravity, which causes the tongue and other tissues to fall backward and block your airway when you lie flat on your back.

Roll up several tea towels and place them in the middle of your back to keep you off it – comfortably – unlike the tennis ball technique.

8. Over-the-counter products aren’t that effective

After testing popular store-bought snoring aids, including an oral spray, nasal strips and head-positioning pillows, a study from Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery found that none significantly reduce snoring’s frequency or volume. That’s because snoring causes differ from person to person.

Ask your GP or Dentist for advice and make sure that you get help from a professional company. Look for NHS endorsed products.

9. There’s a comfortable alternative to cumbersome sleep masks

New compact oral appliances are worthy adversaries to the bulky, airblowing Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) masks, which are the traditional treatment for obstructive sleep apnoea. Instead of uncomfortable and claustrophobic air pressure masks, high quality oral appliances thrust the bottom jaw forward to prevent airway blockage during sleep, just like CPR. These devices are more portable and comfortable, making patients more likely to stick with them.

Although snoring will end quickly with a mouthpiece, severe apnoea patients should continue to track their other symptoms.

By John Redfern


SleepPro supports the British Lung Foundation

SleepPro supports the British Lung Foundation

The British Lung Foundation has launched a new online action that enables people to email their local parliamentarian, urging them to take action in parliaments and governments across the UK to draw attention to the problems presented by heavy snoring and obstructive sleep apnoea.

Most people will snore at one time or another but the incidence of heavy snoring is increasing rapidly, mostly due to lifestyle factors, and snoring is now thought to regularly affect the lives of 40% of men in the UK, and 25% of women, which if correct, adds up to almost 20 million people.

In addition, up to 4 per cent of middle-aged men and 2 per cent of middle-aged women in the UK have obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA. With awareness of OSA low among the general public and even healthcare professionals, and up to 80 per cent of people with OSA remaining undiagnosed (and some studies suggest this could be even higher), there is a real need to take action on OSA – a known killer.

sleep cycle

Health boards are already under pressure to cut costs and improve standards by centralising services, but the British Lung Foundation says solutions can be found to provide better access for rural patients who are the ones to suffer most from lack of treatment or even diagnosis – and often with inevitable fatal results.

Earlier this year, the BLF launched a ten-point charter calling on governments and decision makers across the UK to take action to ensure that people affected by OSA are diagnosed earlier, and that they and their families get the treatment and support they need.

In a very short time this will save thousands of lives – and a great deal of money in the NHS budgets.

Dr Penny Woods, Chief Executive, British Lung Foundation said:

Obstructive sleep apnoea is a treatable condition, but unfortunately awareness of it is not always what it should be. As a consequence too many people remain undiagnosed and untreated. Getting parliamentarians across the UK to engage with OSA as an issue is a great way to ensure the UK’s various governments and decision makers give OSA the attention it deserves.”

Caroline Stevens, Interim Chief Operating Officer at the BLF, said:

“The BLF’s OSA charter reflects the need for earlier diagnosis, better access to treatment and increased awareness – both amongst the wider public and medical community. The impact of OSA on health and lifestyle means these recommendations not only have the potential to save lives, but to make considerable savings to the NHS at a time of great financial pressure”.

Please help everyone with this problem by taking action now.

To write to your MP, MSP, AM or MLA by visiting this page:

www.blf.org.uk/osa-action

By John Redfern


Snorers who lie-in are TWICE as likely to develop bowel cancer

Snorers who sleep more than nine hours a night are twice as likely to develop bowel cancer than snorers who get seven hours of sleep a night, according to new research conducted at Harvard in the USA.

According to the Harvard study, snoring isn’t just annoying it poses very serious risks to a person’s health.

The study showed a significant link between long periods of sleep and the development of colorectal cancer, especially among people who are overweight or who snore. As a result, it is believed that obstructive sleep apnoea, a form of snoring that causes interrupted breathing during sleep, could contribute to an increased risk of cancer. One of the effects of sleep apnoea is that you are likely to suffer from excess fatigue because of disrupted sleep and this makes sufferers prone to sleeping longer to try to catch up.

The researchers asked participants to estimate their total hours of sleep in a 24-hour period and asked them if they snore.

A statement from the Department of Medicine at Harvard Medical School gave the following information:

‘Our current study adds to the very limited literature regarding the relationship between sleep duration, sleep quality and colorectal cancer risk. The novel observation of increased risk among regular snorers who sleep for long periods raises the possibility that sleep apnoea and its intermittent oxygen deprivation may contribute to cancer risk.’

Of 76,368 women and 30,121 men the researchers documented a total of 1,973 cases of colorectal cancer – almost 2 per cent of the total.

They broke the participants into subgroups which showed that men and women who were overweight, or who were regular snorers, and who reported sleeping nine hours or more per day, had a 1.4 to 2-fold increased risk of developing colorectal cancer compared to overweight people, or snorers, who got seven hours sleep a day.

The general recommendation is that most adults should get about seven to eight hours of sleep a night.

The authors suggest that the association between long sleep duration and colorectal cancer may be explained by obstructive sleep apnoea, which involves repetitive episodes of complete or partial upper airway obstruction during sleep.

The most common cause of obstructive sleep apnoea is excess body weight, and loud snoring is a common symptom of the condition.

The researchers strongly believe that sleep disruption caused by heavy snoring may reduce sleep quality and increase sleepiness, resulting in longer reported sleep durations. In addition to this, intermittent oxygen deprivation, similar to that which occurs in people with sleep apnoea, has been shown in animal models to promote significant tumour growth.

Other recent research has shown that people who sleep for less than six hours a night are at a significantly increased risk of stroke.

Researchers at the University of Alabama found that those in middle age who skimped on sleep were more likely to suffer stroke symptoms than those who got at least nine hours of shut-eye – even if they were a healthy weight and with no family history of stroke. Yet again, the scientists found that heavy snoring made the problem worse as it reduced the quality of people’s sleep.

The American Academy of Sleep Medicine reports that individual sleep needs vary. However, the general recommendation is that most adults should get about seven to eight hours of nightly sleep.

Relate this information to your own problem of snoring and take some immediate steps to reduce it – it’s ‘sound advice’.
By John Redfern

 


Oral Appliances Recommended For Sleep Apnoea

Perhaps someone has told you your snoring is deafening, or you’ve woken up on lots of mornings feeling less than refreshed. In those instances, it’s probably pretty obvious something is wrong with the way you sleep.

Sometimes it’s easy to diagnose the problem, but in the case of sleep apnoea, a disorder wherein people stop breathing while asleep, sometimes hundreds of times a night, pinpointing the problem can be significantly trickier. These brief periods when you stop breathing don’t trigger full alertness, but disrupt sleep enough to leave sufferers groggy in the mornings — and at risk for a number of more serious health problems, often without even realizing there’s a problem.

People with undiagnosed sleep apnoea may go on to develop depression, or even diabetes, and face an increased risk of heart attacks and strokes, among other concerns.

Men over the age of 40 are most at risk. Being overweight also increases your likelihood of developing the condition, as can a family history of the disease, having a large tongue or neck and having allergies, sinus problems or any nasal obstruction, according to WebMD.

Luckily, there are a number of ways to treat sleep apnoea including simple lifestyle measures like losing weight and avoiding alcohol. But all too often a sleep apnoea diagnosis is hard to come by

A family member or bed partner is often first to notice the signs, usually snoring or brief periods of no breathing.

But don’t leave your health entirely in the hands of the people sleeping around you – take advice and do something about it.

‘Debbie’ wrote in to say that she was recently diagnosed with sleep apnoea. She was scheduled to get a CPAP breathing machine to treat it but when she went to her dentist she learned about another treatment option: a dental appliance fitted to her mouth, designed to keep her airway open when she sleeps.

As she is also mildly claustrophobic, it sounded like a better option. Now, months later, her sleep apnoea is gone and she’s seeing a chain of health benefits.

“I get up early, I’m usually busy all day,” she said. “I hardly ever nap anymore. My blood pressure is better.  I’ve cut my medicine in half and lost a little bit of weight and I just feel a lot better.”

A Sleep Centre Medical Director, Dr. Michael Coats, said the mandibular repositioning dental appliances are getting more popular. Before, the idea of a breathing machine may even have discouraged people from coming forward to get their sleep apnoea diagnosed.

“I think there’s lots of people that are more willing to seek treatment and evaluation if they realize they have options in regards to their treatment,” Coats said.

Debbie’ss dentist, Dr. Rob Heinrich, said it made sense to incorporate the dental devices into his business. The majority of the people he supplies with an oral appliance come in as recommendations from Sleep centres.

“What we’re finding is the compliance rates for the oral appliances is higher,” Heinrich said. “The efficacy or the success rate of the oral appliance may be lower, although, if the patient is not wearing a CPAP at all, the next best thing can be an oral appliance to help them.”

If you think you’re at risk – take a look at the range of oral appliances that are available from SleepPro – including a ready made Self Fit version for extra comfort, and the ultimate Custom version, specially made to fit you.
By John Redfern


THE AAA SAYS 16% of FATAL CRASHES CAUSED BY A DROWSY DRIVER

People with sleep apnoea are more likely to fail a driving simulator test and report nodding while driving, according to new research. For the sufferers of sleep apnoea, driving is highly dangerous for all on the roads.

Sleep apnoea may affect as many as 40 per cent of truck drivers, according to recent research in the USA, but a new study suggests they may be underreporting its effects.

The new study, which will be presented at the European Respiratory Society’s Annual Congress this week, shows that commercial vehicle drivers are more likely to understate their daytime sleepiness from the condition than people who don’t work in that field. The Congress was jointly organized by the European Respiratory Society, and the European Sleep Research Society.

Obstructive sleep apnoea is characterized by having pauses in breathing or shallow breathing while sleeping to create disrupted sleep and has previously been linked with an increased chance of being involved in road traffic accidents.

A research team from the University Hospital in Leeds, UK, carried out two separate studies looking at the effect sleep apnoea has on driving during a simulator test, carried out at the University of Leeds.

In the first study, 133 patients with untreated sleep apnoea and 89 people without the condition took part in the test. All participants completed a 90 km motorway driving simulation and were tested on a number of key criteria, including: The ability to complete the distance, time spent in the middle lane, an unprovoked crash or a veer event crash.

The results showed that patients with untreated sleep apnoea were more likely to fail the test. Twenty-four per cent of the sleep apnoea patients failed the test, compared to 12 per cent of the people without the condition. Many patients with sleep apnoea were unable to complete the test, had more unprovoked crashes and could not adhere to the clear driving instructions given at the beginning of the simulator test.

In the second study, 118 patients with untreated sleep apnoea and 69 people without the condition completed a questionnaire about their driving behaviour and undertook the 90 km driving test on the simulator.

Thirty-five per cent of patients with sleep apnoea admitted to nodding at the wheel and subsequently 38 per cent of this group failed the test. This compared to 11 per cent of people without the condition admitting to nodding and none of this group failing the test.

“In the first study, although some people in the control group also failed the test, there were several key differences in the reasons for failure,” said Dr. Mark Elliott, chief investigator. “For example 13 patients were unable to complete the test because they fell asleep, veered completely off the motorway and 5 patients because they spent more than 5 per cent of the study outside of the lane that they had been instructed to remain in. No controls failed for either of these reasons. Further investigation is needed to examine the reasons for failure of the simulator test.”

The public health implications of drowsy driving are clear:  The AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety estimates that more than 16 per cent of fatal crashes involve a drowsy driver.

To promote awareness of drowsy driving, the AASM released a free online presentation describing the signs, causes and effects of driver fatigue and some strategies to manage it.  SAFE-D: Sleep, Alertness and Fatigue Education for Drivers is available at www.aasmnet.org/safed.aspx. The presentation also is on YouTube and Vimeo to share or embed.
By John Redfern


STOP SNORING WEEK • Day 5

Ladies – Do you Snore – or are you actually very ill?

According to the very latest research, one woman for every two men are now diagnosed with sleep disorders. Basically their partner may snore – or it may even be themselves that is snoring. No longer ladies, can you tell your men that snoring is a man thing.

Men are also more likely to seek help for their snoring, outnumbering women eight to one, which could support the argument that men’s snoring is more disruptive than women’s snoring. But there has been a recent growth in women seeking help for their problem.

Mostly help is sought for social reasons – disruption – but if that problem is not just snoring, but obstructive sleep apnoea, then there are some very serious health implications too.

A study found that women who sleep with snorers might get decent sleep just 73 per cent of the time they are in bed; women who do not sleep with snorers get more than 90 per cent. So a woman who gets eight hours of beauty rest is awakened multiple times and might really get only five or six hours. More disturbing is the university’s finding that couples who are plagued by snoring are more likely to divorce, although we doubt that anyone has ever listed it on divorce papers as the reason for the split.

Men, or Women, who complain of persistent sleep disruption should encourage their partner to see their family doctors to rule out underlying problems such as anaemia, depression, fibromyalgia, thyroid disorder, etc. The doctor might also recommend a sleep study to rule out sleep apnoea, which is easily treated with positioning pillows, mouthpieces and CPAP devices. Sleep apnoea occurs when breathing stops because the airway becomes completely blocked.

‘Female First’ reports that over 40% of people say their partners snoring habit has a negative impact on how well they sleep and while a third of people have no idea why they snore, more than half have never done anything to stop themselves doing so.

This blind acceptance by snorers is contributing to some extreme reactions from long-suffering partners. Nearly a third of other halves resort to sleeping in another room while 2 in 5 engage in bedtime tussles, moving their partner from their back to their side to help ease the noise.

And this now applies to both men and women – not men alone – but women are not snoring more – there are just more of them seeking help. As obesity rates continue to rise and extra weight has an influence over snoring for lots of people, it is not unexpected that people are linking it with recent reports that more women are coming to clinics to stop their snoring. Drinking and smoking are additional contributory lifestyle factors.

If it is simply snoring, invest in an NHS recommended oral appliance, a dental mouthpiece, and you will quickly put it right.

If you suffer from obstructive sleep apnoea, you should consult your GP who may decide in consultation that you need a CPAP machine for night-time use. However, in the USA, where snoring problems and OSA have been accepted and treated for many years in advance of the UK, an alternative to a Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) machine is becoming a more popular remedy for sleep apnoea.

Sleep Centre Directors in the US are recommending mouthpieces for the problem as they are likely not to deter patients from coming forward and they are also likely to be used much more. Rejection of CPAP has been a problem for many years and for many reasons including extreme dryness of the throat and even claustrophobia.

A relevant comment from a leading Sleep Centre Director, Dr Michael Coats, was made last Thursday on Sleep Apnoea Day:

“What we’re finding is the compliance rates for the oral appliances is higher,” he said. “The efficacy or the success rate of the oral appliance may be a little lower, although, if the patient is not wearing a CPAP at all, the next best thing can be an oral appliance to help them.”

By John Redfern


STOP SNORING WEEK • Day 4

Children’s Health • Snoring – What Mothers really need to know.

Snoring in children can range from a gentle little noise every now and then, to a loud snore every night. At a worrying time like this, with Measles topping the headlines as a health danger for children, parents need to better understand what snoring is and whether or not it is a problem for their child.

What Is Snoring?
Snoring is the sound of the upper-airway passage vibrating with effort to let air pass through. The louder and more chronic and constant the snore is, the more likely it is that the upper airway is not only floppy, but perhaps not staying ‘open’ enough for air to get through during sleep.

When the upper airway closes fully during sleep, this is called obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). If this occurs, the air, and therefore the oxygen, will stop flowing through the body for a short while and the child will appear to stop breathing. After a few seconds, the body will react to the lack of oxygen, and the child will take a deep breath, gasp and then settle back into a normal breathing and sleeping pattern until the next time the flow of oxygen stops.

Sometimes this upper-airway obstruction is only partial and is called Hypopnea Syndrome (HS). This is not as severe as OSA, but still needs attention in children because even small amounts of upper-airway collapsibility can indicate problems with overnight breathing.

However, not all snoring is due to OSA or HS. Primary snoring is snoring that does not involve upper-airway closure or blood-oxygen reduction. Many children have occasional primary snoring, particularly between the ages of two and four, or when they have a cold or allergy.

If the snoring is chronic, and is not related to a cold or an allergy, then it is worth investigating because research suggests primary snoring (even without oxygen changes or gasping for breath) still disrupts sleep.

What Impact Does Snoring Have On Children?
Snoring children will have constantly disrupted and poor-quality sleep. They are more likely to have nightmares and night terrors, and be restless. It is thought that snoring children are hot and sweaty due to difficulty regulating their body temperature and/or because they move around a lot.

Snoring, particularly when it is associated with OSA or HS, can also have an impact on daytime performance, the same as it does with adults, including reduced attention and memory performance, and problem-solving skills, which can affect learning and schoolwork. Snoring, poor sleep and OSA can also increase the likelihood of weight gain.

What Causes Snoring?
As noted above, snoring is caused mainly by a floppy upper airway, but other factors can play a role in this. They are:
1.    Jaw or nose shape
2.    Age: children between two and four are more likely to snore 3.    Allergies and colds
4.    Obesity
5.    Large tonsils and/or adenoids

How Prevalent Is Snoring In Children?
Snoring is common between the ages of two and four, and up to 30 per cent of children will snore during that age range and not snore again. But in general, 15 per cent of children will suffer from primary snoring more than three times per week, and about two per cent of those children will have OSAS or HS.

To begin to investigate your child’s snoring, speak to your GP who will refer you to the appropriate health professional if there is a problem.

Treatment Options Available
The treatments for snoring are aimed at trying to get the air to move freely through the upper airway during sleep and the cause of the snore will dictate the treatment. Most symptomatic snoring is usually treated in children over two years of age with an operation to take out enlarged tonsils or adenoids.

Sometimes there is a need for additional treatments to clear the nose with sprays and medications, or surgery. One possibility for resistant OSA is the continuous positive airways pressure (CPAP) machine. This is a ventolin mask worn over the nose and mouth during sleep that keeps the airways open by diverting air down through the airway during sleep.

This machine, while very effective, is often difficult for children to wear – and even adults reject it as a route. Very few children will need treatment such as the CPAP machine for sleep apnoea for the rest of their lives.

Do Children Outgrow Snoring?
Snoring generally resolves itself, either with age or intervention. In fact, there is still a lot of research needed to help us to get the best treatments for snoring that will ensure children will remain healthy throughout their lives.

Snoring does not necessarily indicate a problem, but if your child does snore, even when they do not have a cold, parents should be vigilant for any problems.
By John Redfern


STOP SNORING WEEK • Day 3

SleepPro support the British Lung Foundation in their action on sleep apnoea

It has become more and more apparent that heavy snoring and OSA (obstructive sleep apnoea) need to be treated much more seriously by all the national health services. As a consequence The British Lung Foundation has launched a new online initiative that encourages people to email their local parliamentarian, urging them to take action in parliament in the UK to draw attention to the problems presented by obstructive sleep apnoea.

Up to 4 per cent of middle-aged men and 2 per cent of middle-aged women in the UK have obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) and most of these cases go undiagnosed and untreated.

Obstructive sleep apnoea is a condition in which people continually stop breathing when muscle and soft tissues in the throat relax during sleep and block the airway.

With awareness of OSA low among the general public and healthcare professionals, and up to 80 per cent of people with OSA remaining undiagnosed (and some studies suggest this could be even higher), there is a real need to take action on OSA.

Earlier this year, the BLF launched a ten-point charter calling on governments and decision makers across the UK to take action to ensure that people affected by OSA are diagnosed earlier, and that they and their families get the treatment and support they need.

Dr Penny Woods, Chief Executive, British Lung Foundation said:

“Obstructive sleep apnoea is a treatable condition, but unfortunately awareness of it is not always what it should be. As a consequence too many people remain undiagnosed and untreated. Getting parliamentarians across the UK to engage with OSA as an issue is a great way to ensure the UK’s various governments and decision makers give OSA the attention it deserves.”

When we go to sleep our muscles relax, including those in our throat. In some people the relaxing muscles cause the throat to narrow, which can reduce the airflow. This results in snoring.

If the throat closes (obstructs) completely, you stop breathing temporarily – this is called an apnoea, or if throat partially closes it is called a hypopnoea. When this happens, there may be a dip in the level of oxygen in the blood.

The brain starts the person breathing again: some people wake up briefly, others are not aware of what is happening. Breathing often restarts with a gasp, and the pattern repeats. In severe cases this cycle happens hundreds of times a night. This can cause the person to feel very sleepy during the day, because their sleep is being disrupted at night.

The oxygen disruption is extremely dangerous and can be a key factor in the development of long-term health problems such as diabetes, stroke, cardiovascular problems and even cancer.

Act now…..Save Lives

To write to your MP, MSP, AM or MLA by visiting this page:
www.blf.org.uk/osa-action
By John Redfern


STOP SNORING WEEK • Day 2

Most heavy snoring goes untreated – and causes serious health problems

Serious cases of sleep apnoea and heavy snoring have been very much the focus of most of the media in the last week – not just because of ‘Stop Snoring Week’, but also due to World Sleep Apnoea Day last Thursday.

Snoring is no longer regarded as being simply just a male domain and it is thought that snoring affects at least 4 million people in the UK alone. With obesity rates stubbornly high and rising, as well as the influence that alcohol intake and smoking has over snoring, more and more women are also trying to prevent their snoring once and for all.

Current estimates suggest that 40 per cent of UK men snore and 25 per cent of all women – and the figures are rising quickly due to lifestyle factors.

The world’s health systems are finally beginning to realise the true severity and the massive scale of the problem that exists, and it is one that is growing rapidly due to problems such as the increasing tendency to obesity and the social changes that have produced a different lifestyle for us all. Lesser physical activity in the jobs that we do is considered to be quite a major contributory factor….in essence, we sit too long.

In addition, many hospitals, universities and other qualified research bodies around the world have produced very detailed studies that have stated categorically that the majority of cases go untreated, resulting in serious health problems for the sufferer later in life – particularly the over 40’s.

The risk of cardiovascular disease, stroke, diabetes, and even cancer have all been linked to heavy snoring, and so have poor sleep patterns – along with the major social problems that are always associated with them – daytime fatigue affecting work, and disturbed nights affecting relationships.

The saving for the health system of tackling snoring in any form is massive. The big problem is to get people to accept that they snore because they don’t hear it – so listen to your partner’s opinion – and act on it.

The general viewpoint is that many heavy snorers and sleep apnoea sufferers are put off by the thought of having to wear breathing masks all night – uncomfortable, restraining, and causing very dry throats – let alone being extremely claustrophobic.

With that in mind, many experts are directing those who snore towards the oral appliance route; a mouthpiece that acts quickly, is easier to adapt to, and is easily available both through the NHS, your dentist, or simply from a reputable manufacturer – and with no prescription required.

Companies such as SleepPro offer a range of optional mouthpieces to suit all snorers and at highly affordable prices – in fact can you really afford not to. They all come with high success rates and were designed in consultation with both doctors and dentists, and importantly are NHS approved.
By John Redfern