Snoring mothers-to-be are linked to low birth weight babies

The British Press have covered this subject extensively this week based on the results of a new research study that has just been completed in the United States. The research was published in the journal ‘Sleep’.

Snoring can be more than just an annoyance to others who are trying to sleep in the same room. For pregnant women, snoring could indicate certain higher risks. Experts say that snoring may be a sign of breathing problems that could deprive an unborn baby of oxygen.

Snoring is often a key sign of obstructive sleep apnoea, which results in the airway becoming partially blocked, said the researchers, whose findings appear in the journal Sleep. This can reduce blood oxygen levels during the night and is associated with serious health problems, including high blood pressure and heart attacks. The experts stress sleep apnoea can of course be easily treated.

The study found that chronic snorers, who snored both before and during pregnancy, were two thirds more likely to have a baby whose weight was in the bottom 10%.

Newborn baby girl sleeping

They were also more than twice as likely to need an elective Caesarean delivery, or C-section, compared with non-snorers.

Dr Louise O’Brien, from the University of Michigan’s Sleep Disorders Centre, said: “There has been great interest in the implications of snoring during pregnancy and how it affects maternal health but there is little data on how it may impact the health of the baby.

“We’ve found that chronic snoring is associated with both smaller babies and C-sections, even after we accounted for other risk factors. This suggests that we have a window of opportunity to screen pregnant women for breathing problems during sleep that may put them at risk of poor delivery outcomes.”

Previous research has already shown that women who start to snore during pregnancy are at risk from high blood pressure and the potentially dangerous pregnancy condition pre-eclampsia.

More than a third of the 1,673 pregnant women recruited for the new US study reported habitual snoring. They were also more than twice as likely to need an elective Caesarean delivery, or C-section, compared with non-snorers.

Scientists found that women who snored in their sleep three or more nights per week had a higher risk of poor delivery outcomes, including smaller babies and Caesarean births.

The very worst cases of sleep apnoea can be treated with CPAP (continuous positive airway pressure), which involves wearing a mask attached to a machine during sleep, which pumps oxygen to keep the airways open. Most other forms of sleep apnoea can be treated with the wearing of a simple snoring mouthpiece, similar to a gumshield that is worn for sports.

Dr O’Brien added: “If we can identify risks during pregnancy that can be treated, such as obstructive sleep apnoea, we can reduce the incidence of small babies, C-sections and possibly NICU (neo-natal intensive care unit) admission that not only improve long-term health benefits for the newly born but also help keep costs down.”

By John Redfern


Sleep disorders vary regionally – and so does support and diagnosis

Recent research carried out by the British Lung Foundation, in conjunction with both Guys and St Thomas’ Hospital in London, has highlighted that the provision of services to diagnose obstructive sleep apnoea, or OSA, varies a great deal across the UK, and it doesn’t match the worst areas for the problem.

OSA is linked to serious ill health, and the figures for the problem have continued to rise steeply across the last few years. This is partly due to the higher numbers of the population reaching middle age, at which time OSA becomes much more prevalent, and also because of certain lifestyle factors. Increased weight is a major contributory factor in the problem, due to our vastly changed pattern of eating and drinking across the last decade.

The population’s average age and girth has increased, both of which are risk factors for obstructive sleep apnoea. These increases are forecast to continue.

Sleep Apnoea infographic

Disturbed unsatisfactory sleep

OSA is a condition that disrupts breathing during sleep, usually as a result of the muscles and soft tissues in the throat relaxing and collapsing to block the airway. This usually lasts for 10 or more seconds. It affects people of all ages, including up to 4% of middle-aged men, 2% of middle-aged women and 20% of those aged over 70. However, it is estimated that around 80% of cases remain undiagnosed. In real terms we estimate about four million people in the UK to be sufferers.

Although it’s relatively easy to treat OSA, when it is left undiagnosed and untreated, it has been closely linked with a range of serious health concerns including stroke, heart disease, depression, diabetes, and high blood pressure. More recently, Alzheimer’s disease, glaucoma, and certain forms of cancer have also been related to it. OSA can also significantly affect one’s quality of life and ability to work, as well as increasing the chances of road accidents due to fatigue.

Regional differences

Wales, large parts of East Anglia, East Yorkshire, Lincolnshire and the North-East were found to be areas with the highest predicted rates of OSA. Larger urban areas in England and Scotland and the counties to the west of London were amongst the areas with the lowest predicted prevalence.

This pattern contrasted considerably with the availability of local sleep services for diagnosing and treating the condition, with large urban areas being better served despite the lower risk of OSA, and parts of mid-Wales, the North-West and East Anglia having much lower numbers of identified sleep centres, of which there are 289 in total, each one being required to serve an average of 1.25 million people.

Diagnosis of OSA

Professor Adrian Williams, Medical Advisor at the British Lung Foundation, Professor of Sleep Medicine at Guys and St Thomas’ Hospital, and co-author of the study says in a press statement: “Too often, a lack of awareness leads to the symptoms of OSA being not recognised or dismissed simply as an irritation for anyone who shares a room with someone affected. However, OSA can have a severe impact on quality of life and is associated with a range of serious health problems including heart disease, stroke, diabetes and depression.

“In most cases, OSA is easily treatable in a way that can successfully minimise the associated risks.

Self-diagnosis is therefore often a key requirement for OSA, and fortunately, by using easily accessible NHS approved products, such as an oral appliance, or mouthpiece which keeps open the airway whilst sleeping, the majority of serious cases can be prevented and better health attained.

By John Redfern


Snoring can trigger a stroke or heart attack

Whilst waiting to go into a meeting the other day I happened to pick up a copy of a daily newspaper in the waiting area, and came across an interesting comment in the column written by the well-known agony aunt Miriam Stoppard.

It should be said that as well as having performed that role, and also that of TV presenter, she is a fully qualified Doctor, having worked in several major hospitals including that in her home town, Newcastle, before going on to become the managing director of a large pharmaceutical company. She has also written several books on health including The Children’s Medical Handbook.

Here’s what she wrote:

One of my sons snored so loudly that the whole house seemed to vibrate. It was the vibrations that worried me, not the noise.
Then I read some research showing that road workers who habitually used a pneumatic drill can get disease of the arteries in their arms due to the vibrations from the drill. It’s called Raynaud’s disease and is the result of furring up your blood vessels. In cold weather, your hands get cold and painful very quickly – so-called dead hands”.

White Finger from chain saw

Coming from an area where using this type of equipment was common, I was familiar with it, but knew it locally as ‘Vibration White Finger Disease’ – which aptly describes the look of the sufferer’s hands. It was quite common amongst Forestry workers. Medical research has proved that this arterial disease is due to the regular vibrations from industrial drills or saws.

It transpires that the vibrations due to snoring can have a similar effect to this.

Snoring can trigger stroke and heart trouble – and this is because habitual snorers are more likely to develop furred up carotid arteries – the main arteries in the neck that supply oxygenated blood to most of the brain.

Further research shows the trauma caused by the vibrations of snoring may result in inflammation leading to arteries thickening, and cutting down the blood flow.

Snoring is commonly linked to hardening of the arteries around the heart, which can lead to heart attacks. It is thought that this may be due to sleep apnoea that can cause the inflammation and contribute to furred up arteries.

We assess that three million Britons have sleep apnoea, where the tissue of the throat muscles collapses, triggering snoring and, in some cases, stopping the flow of air altogether, leading to you briefly waking up, but the majority of cases go undiagnosed – mostly because snoring is still ignored – and simple treatment such as an anti-snoring mouthpiece is so easily available. These oral appliances are worn at night, preventing your snoring immediately. They are highly effective, are non-prescription and some are also NHS Approved.

They can save lives – maybe yours. 

By John Redfern


Snoring can cause Women to put on weight

Lack of sleep affects food choices and if you don’t sleep well it can cause you to choose more high-calorie foods. So, not only does being overweight cause you to snore, it would appear that snoring causes you to gain weight too.

It’s obviously normal for a poor night’s sleep to affect you the next day and make you feel tired; if it’s a constant problem then it could have some wide-ranging effects on your health.

Several studies have suggested that a lack of sleep can increase the chance of weight gain and obesity. It may be that a lack of sleep affects hormones that help control our appetite, that people eat more calories to make up for the tiring effects of lost sleep, or that people who stay up late tend to sleep less overall and eat more calories during their extended waking hours.

Snoring and Weight gain

However, these are mostly theories, as few good-quality studies have explored the link between sleep, eating, and weight gain. To help fill this gap in what we know, researchers recruited 225 healthy, non-obese people (aged 22 to 50 years old) to live in a sleep laboratory for 12 to 18 days.

They randomly selected participants to have five nights of either:
Restricted sleep, with four hours in bed, from 4 a.m. to 8 a.m., or
Unrestricted sleep, with 10 hours in bed, from 10 p.m. to 8 a.m.

During the day, people had regular meals and could also eat at other times, as food was always available in the kitchen. What food they ate and their weight were closely monitored, so the researchers could compare the two groups to see whether restricted sleep increased the chance of weight gain.

What did we learn?
People who had restricted sleep consumed more calories than those who had unrestricted sleep.
All of the extra calories – around 550 per day on average – were from food consumed between 10 p.m. and 4 a.m.
When eating late at night, people also got more of their calories from higher fat foods than at other times of the day.
On average, people with restricted sleep gained nearly a kilo of weight, while those with unrestricted sleep gained only one-tenth of a kilogram.

How reliable is the research?
This was a good-quality study. However, it’s worth noting it only included people who were healthy, fairly young, and not obese. So it’s not clear whether these findings will definitely apply to other groups of people. Also, the participants weren’t able to exercise during the study and might not have had access to all the foods they usually ate. These things might have had an effect on the findings.

What does this mean for me?
It provides good evidence that restricted sleep can increase how many calories you eat and leads to weight gain, at least in the short term. If you tend to stay up late and/or get little sleep, it may be especially pertinent to you as after 10 p.m. was when people typically got their extra calories, rather than during the day.

By John Redfern


Snoring, sleep apnoea, and sleep loss in women

Snoring, and sleep apnoea in particular, were both generally considered to be conditions predominantly affecting men but we now know this not to be the case, with the ration of men to women estimated at approximately 2:1. Since sleep apnoea is mainly a problem that is self-reported , men were more likely to seek help for this and heavy snoring, even if prompted to do so by their partner.

Approximately 50% of women snorers are believed not to report their symptoms to their GP, mostly due to being embarrassed. Some studies show that as many as 90% of more severe cases go undiagnosed in women, and women have a tendency not to report apnoea events, choking or restless sleep, whereas most men did report these matters.

Treatment however can be both simple and inexpensive and it can prevent major health problems in later life. Sufferers are often put off by the thought that the treatment most used historically was CPAP, where air is forced via a mask into the lungs throughout the whole night. More recent thinking is to recommend the use of an oral appliance for mild and moderate cases of sleep apnoea.

Sleep apnea in womenComparison showing Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP and an Oral Appliance (MAD)

The contrast is shown in the photography above where one patient is using a mask

for CPAP and the other an oral appliance – just distinguishable in the inset, with the result that this method is now much more appealing to those who suffer – both men and women. This treatment, although not quite so effective, works very well.

Snoring often results in a disturbed night and it is very common to hear a comment such as – “I barely slept last night. I just couldn’t get comfortable” – or – “I tried to fall asleep, but my mind kept racing.”

Sleep, and the lack of it, is a common talking point, and disturbed sleep generally is much more common in women than men. A woman’s experience of sleep loss is different and sometimes feminine factors are involved that may cause and maintain sleep difficulties. However, focusing on quality sleep is important to help prevent many aspects of both physical and mental health.

Disruption of sleep leads not only to daytime sleepiness, but memory lapses, weight gain, headaches, irritability and poor work performance overall. It can also contribute to psychological disorders such as depression and for the more severe cases, there’s an increased risk of high blood pressure, premature heart disease and stroke.

It’s not an area to neglect.

The best solution is an approach on several fronts including exercise, reduced alcohol consumption, healthy eating and treatment for the sleep apnoea or heavy snoring which will stop the snoring immediately whilst other things take time.

There are several treatment solutions including surgery, CPAP (Continuous Positive Airways Pressure) a full-face mask which works by stopping the airways from collapsing, or a mandibular advancement device, like a sports mouth-guard, that holds the lower jaw slightly forward, making more space to breathe.

Many women now opt for the mouthpiece. It’s easy to wear, quite comfortable, non-claustrophobic unlike the mask, and doesn’t create dryness of the mouth, which CPAP has a tendency to do. Mouthpieces are easily acquired as they are non-prescription, but some are NHS Approved, which is preferable, and they will bring you immediate results.

SleepPro now have a special product in their range dedicated to women only – the only oral appliance technology company to do so.

By John Redfern


Massive increases recorded in the number of women who snore

Women in particular do not like to think they snore – there’s a stigma attached to it – yet they now account for 40 per cent of snorers,” says Dr Martin Allen, who is a consultant physician at the University Hospital of North Staffordshire, and a spokesperson for the British Lung Foundation.

Snoring damages health

Previously considered by many to be a predominantly male domain, it is now women who account for almost half of the snoring problem in the UK. There is no denying that it is predominantly their changed lifestyle that has caused the problem, and again there is massive proof to support this. Latest figures show that women are seeking to resolve it however, and are dealing with it in a number of ways, dependent upon the problem’s severity.

Clinics are now advising 10 times more women snorers than 2 years ago – and the problem is conclusively a result of drinking, smoking, and weight gain. As well as the health problems previously mentioned, fatigue and irritability are also often a major result of having that disturbed night’s rest.

As we are all aware, stopping smoking is difficult, even in Stoptober, drinking tends to be an important part of all our social lives, and losing those extra pounds is harder work still, which can often necessitate lots of time and expense at the Gym in the early morning or after a busy day – which is not always convenient.

The majority of women snorers can stop snoring immediately through the use of a simple oral appliance that has previously been targeted at men alone; it’s fast, unobtrusive, and inexpensive. It’s a simple mouthpiece that helps to keep the airway open at night when asleep. No prescription is required and some products in the UK already have NHS Approval Status having been tried and tested for many years. It’s both fast and effective and it can stop your snoring whilst you’re working hard correcting those other lifestyle issues.

SleepPro are the leading British company in this field and their oral appliances are recommended by Clinics, Doctors, and Dentists throughout the world. As well as having full NHS Approval they have a recorded 98% success rate for product effectiveness, which at the end of the day is what counts most.

To meet this new and rising demand from women they have now taken it further and are the first to produce a specially produced mouthpiece for women that has now become available land was launched just this week.

Look for new SleepPro Woman – it’s pink, not the traditional male blue, and in the early sales period, there’s a pound donation from every sale going to support the vital research carried out by the Breast Cancer Campaign – appropriately named #wearitpink.

By John Redfern


Snoring tops the new “Hate List’ for bedroom annoyances

We all need a good night’s sleep regularly but in a recent nationwide survey in the United Kingdom, snoring topped the list of our most hated bedroom annoyances by a country mile and came top of the list with 54% in the poll taken in this multi-response survey.

Maybe it’s not a lot to ask from a loved one, but sound, restful sleep is incredibly important to our lives in so many ways, and we seemingly fail to make it possible for each other. Millions of people in Britain are losing vital hours of good sleep because their partner is disturbing their sleep.

To put it in perspective, an adult needs to get at least 8 hours restful and undisturbed sleep each night for their mind and their body to perform at their best the next day. This is not happening.

A whopping 74% claim that they lose at least one hour’s sleep per night and that’s the same as going one night each week without going to bed at all.

Snoring causes arguments

One fact is new – and that is that we are owning up to snoring at last, whereas we either used to dismiss it altogether or simply regard it as a joke. The same survey showed that 44% of us owned up to snoring.

There are other reasons too for these disturbed nights, as well as snoring, but this was by far the leading ‘annoyance’ with couples, and many of these bad habits seem to be turning our bedrooms into battlefields.

Leading the way in the table of hates and dislikes were these:

Snoring 54%

Hogging the duvet 46%

Sleeping naked 41%

Restless fidgeting 40%

Stealing partner’s space 36%

Passing wind 34%

Bad Breath 27%

Sweating 26%

Allowing pets into bed 17%

Sleep Talking 17%

Most of these problems can of course be solved – including snoring.

Bedtime however was considered important, and more than half of the couples that were interviewed stated that they enjoyed quality time in bed with their partner, with pillow talk playing an important role for some 59%, particularly those with children. It gave them time to discuss family matters, plans, future holidays, and of course the dreaded subject of in-laws.

So despite the warfare, it’s a good opportunity for couples to bond and take key decisions together as long as the overall conditions are right for a good night’s sleep.

We should maybe focus on the annoyances and eliminate them – after all it’s so easy to do that, and the overall results could be so beneficial to both marital life and future health.


#Stoptober • Is Smoking Ruining Your Sleep?

#stoptober
The successful Stoptober campaign is under way yet again and as well as assisting you to stop smoking, it can help you in other ways – such as stopping snoring. Snoring happens for lots of different reasons and sleep disorders of this type can be caused by genetics, body weight, or simply age. However we know that smoking can make you snore.
Although smoking can make you snore there are several ways it can do this. The first and second ways are quite obvious. Firstly it can dry out your throat very quickly which isn’t a major cause of snoring, but it can contribute to it. The second way smoking can cause snoring is by direct irritation. When you smoke, the smoke itself irritates your mouth and throat including the mucus membranes and the bronchial tubes. That may not sound like much, but it is.
Because your airway is quite small to begin with, it takes very little for it to be constricted enough for you to start to notice, and all of the irritation that is caused by cigarette smoke leads to inflammation. In such a small space inflammation is not a good thing and it’s enough to constrict your airway and cause you to snore – sometimes very heavily.
However there is actually a third way in which smoking is related to snoring. For some people, smoking causes them to actually create more mucus and if you’re producing too much mucus it can take up space in your airway and make you snore. There is no way to get rid of it completely but reducing your milk intake and increasing the amount of water you drink will help.
Solutions
Even ex-smokers are more likely to snore than someone who has never smoked. However, just because there isn’t an easy solution to the problem that doesn’t mean that the symptoms cannot be treated.
Obviously you can stop smoking. Otherwise, your best bet is probably a simple mouthpiece that you wear at night when sleeping. The mouthpiece is the best way to open up space through the airway and this will prevent you from snoring. It’s comfortable fast, and inexpensive – and can help stop or restrict other associated problems with your health – as well as quite often saving relationships.

Smoking leads to snoring

Smoking affects your sleep in several ways – all to do with the active ingredient, nicotine.

  • Depending on your level of use and dependence, your desire for additional nicotine during your sleep may cause you to awaken and this may lead to insomnia.
  • Nicotine itself is a stimulant and the use of it too close to bedtime may also make it difficult for you to fall asleep.
  • Smoking also is associated with a disruption of the basic structure of your sleep – called the sleep architecture – and this comprises a number of very important stages. Research shows that smokers take slightly longer to fall asleep, sleep less, and have less deep sleep.

For those who quit smoking, these differences in sleep architecture do not persist. So if you smoke and you also have disrupted sleep, this may be yet another very important reason why you should quit.

Stop Now….before it’s too late.

By John Redfern

 

 


Heavy Texting and Social Media are linked to Sleep Problems and poor performance for University students

I recently highlighted the high incidence of sleep disorders in adults, particularly women, and also wrote about the worrying problems that lack of sleep and snoring can cause in children – but what about young adults – particularly students going away from home for the first time?

Sleep deprivation has always been regarded as a major problem for those leaving home to go to College and University – as part of their transition to campus life. Now, a new study in the USA has identified another problem when it comes to students and sleep problems. In a word, it’s Texting.

Sleep Problems and poor performance

In a recent article it was reported that texting was a direct predictor of sleep problems among first-year students in a study that examined links between inter-personal stress, text messaging behaviour, and three indicators of college students’ health: burnout, sleep problems and emotional well-being.

Although the results of this study showed that the impact of texting on a student’s psychological well-being very much depended on the level of interpersonal stress they were already facing, more texting was associated with poorer sleep regardless of their previous level of stress.

The students in the study were all in their first year away from home and answered questions that measured academic and social burnout, emotional well-being, and sleep problems. They were also asked to estimate how many text messages they sent and received on an average day.

The study’s findings on sleep were especially significant given the well-documented compromises in sleep that students experience throughout their time in higher education, but especially in the first year. Several recent studies have shown that 70 per cent of college students receive less than the eight recommended hours of sleep. A recent survey concluded that “Only 40 per cent of students feel rested on two days of the week”.

To assess the students’ sleep quality, a ‘Sleep Quality Index’ was used to fit the college sample. It measured multiple aspects of sleep quality such as sleep duration, the amount of time it takes to fall asleep, the amount of time actually spent sleeping while in bed, night-time disturbances, and any daytime sleepiness.

The key finding was that the higher the number of daily texts – the higher the index of the student’s sleep problems. It is worth noting that this finding reinforces previous evidence pointing to a direct association between the use of mobile phones and poor sleep in adolescents and emerging adults.

Among the possible causes for this connection are two tendencies: students’ feeling pressured to respond immediately to texts, no matter what time of day or night, and students’ sleeping with the phone nearby, thus being awakened by the alerts from incoming texts. Initial conclusions are that heavy text messaging could be problematic during times of stress. Although speculative, it could be argued that texting is a uniquely unsuitable mode of communication for coping with interpersonal stress in close relationships.”

For instance, it is suggested that the abbreviated language that is common in texting — so-called “textese” — lacks the ability to provide the kind of nuance that is important in discussing sensitive issues. In addition, texting fails to offer critical non-verbal indications and hints that would be part of a face-to-face conversation. The Report stated that:

“Text messaging may carry a high risk of producing misunderstandings and unproductive interactions during periods of stress. When interpersonal stress involves conflict, the conditions required for productive communication may be particularly difficult to achieve through texting.”

To put it simply, as well as distracting students from restful sleep, leaving them tired the next day, texts can very easily be misunderstood, and cause more problems than they solve in a conversation.

Texting, Social Networking and other Media use has also been linked to poor academic performance in a US Report which says the widespread use of media among college students — from texting, to chatting on cell phones, to posting status updates on Facebook — may be taking a very serious academic toll.

According to this new study, new women students spent nearly half their day — 12 hours — engaged in some form of media use, particularly texting, music, the Internet and social networking. Researchers found media use, in general, was associated with lower grades an other academic problems. However, there were two exceptions: newspaper reading and listening to music were actually linked to a positive academic performance.

These findings were reported online in the journal Emerging Adulthood, and they offer some new insight into media use in early adulthood, at a time when many young people are living independently for the first time and have significant freedom from parental monitoring.

By John Redfern


Save yourself from anxiety and depression

Depression is “A mental disorder characterized by feelings of gloom and inadequacy” and anxiety is classified as ‘’a feeling of worry, nervousness, or unease about something with an uncertain outcome”. Being anxious or depressed some of the time is normal and is a part of being human. However when anxiety and depression prolongs itself and starts to affect your daily life your relationships and self esteem that gets alarming and needs intervention, be it medical intervention or self help.

Depression is more than short term sadness. Feeling anxious is OK sometimes, before a job interview or before an exam for example but anxiety disorder becomes prolonged and lead to panic attacks. Our feelings are important physiological cues to us and they are gentle ways of nature to tell us about something, they are indicators that we need to amend the specific aspects of our lives and tuning up ourselves is needed.

These feelings of anxiety and negativity are signals for us. Mother Nature is telling us (and if we don’t listen yelling at us) TO DO SOMETHING. They are in fact trying to motivate you. Take the example of a person criticizing you. You will not like it, feel angry or hurt. That is your mind’s response in saving your well-being.

However when these feelings of anxiety and depression get out of control and you feel your productivity is being affected and you don’t want to come out of the bed and just want to vanish or disappear when you think that your existence does not matter to any one and the world would be better off without you this is the kind of feeling you should get rid of and treat.

Getting free from anxiety and depression

Depression is a very painful situation. The agony and the suffering a depressed person undergoes is immense and the good news is that it can be cured. Below is some advice on dealing with the situation:

  • Reprogram your mind: the negative feelings the feeling of worthlessness are all in your mind. Fight them, counter them and do this firmly. Tell yourself again and again that you are a wonderful amazing and unique person. Kill those negative thoughts that let you down and make you feel bad about yourself.
  • Get inspired by people: keep a good company, one that will motivate you, let you learn and grow and excel in life.
  • Get connected with nature: nature has a magical way of healing. Go for a walk, hiking go to the beach or just stroll in a park.
  • Help others: when you lend a helping hand to those who are less fortunate than you are you will feel blessed and thankful and happy.
  • Eat happy: take vitamins, fresh fruits, and maintain a healthy well balanced diet.
  • Exercise: A 30 min walk in the park will boost your mood a lot. Make it a habit to do physical exercise daily and this will relax you and lessen your anxiety.
  • Write it down: a great way to do purification is to write down everything or anything that comes to your mind in a private diary and one feels less stressed. This method is especially helpful if you are having communication problems and find it hard to communicate verbally. This journal therapy is a great way to de stress yourself
  • Live your own life: we have many responsibilities and roles that we are juggling in our daily lives and each responsibility demands a lot from us. Sometimes in the midst of these commitments we neglect our selves drastically and when this gets prolonged we get depressed. It happens that we are doing what pleases our parents our spouses our boyfriends or girl friends or someone else and in all this effort the person getting neglected severely is OUR OWN SELF. So take time for your own self, make yourself happy and LIVE YOUR DREAM.
  • Stop comparing yourself with others: that will just make matters worse for you. You can`t comprehend what problems other people have faced so be grateful for what you have and concentrate on your own life. This way you shall defeat both the anxiety and depression. The grass always looks green on the other side of the fence, but it isn’t.

About the Author:

John Paul is a writer who specializes in sleep disorders. You can check his Sleep Deprivation website, where you can find valuable and latest information about sleep disorders, and much more.