Blocked nose causing you to snore?

We probably don’t think about ‘how’ we breathe as it is a natural function and happens anyway. However, how we breathe is very important, and especially so at night – but not just at that time.

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During sleep, the body naturally tries to breathe through the nose. When nasal congestion forces mouth breathing during sleep, greater negative pressure develops behind the uvula and soft palate. This negative pressure increases the vibration of these noise-makers” during sleep, helping to create the sound we know as snoring which can happen anytime.

We are designed to breathe through the nose. If for any reason nasal breathing is not possible our body’s self-preservation mechanism forces us to breathe through the mouth. There are several reasons as to why some people find it difficult to breathe through the nose during sleep.

  • Small size of nostrils
  • Nasal collapse
  • Nocturnal nasal congestion
  • Nasal obstruction due to anatomic abnormalities

These features increase nasal resistance and this may be a contributing factor in the occurrence of sleep disordered breathing, upper airway resistance syndrome (UARS) and this can happen day or night.

A long hard day at the office after an early start can often result in us falling asleep on the way home and sometimes with embarrassing results.

To highlight an instance of this, the anti-social problem of snoring in public places was underlined last week when rail passengers in one region were given adhesive nasal strips to help prevent it. Research had asked people what was the most annoying thing that had to be endured during rail journeys and 60% said it was clearly snoring, which affects as many as 40% of us, and can reach ear-splitting decibel levels on occasions.

However the major downside of wearing these nasal strips publicly is that everyone can see them, as well as knowing why you’re wearing them, so what’s the alternative.

Nasal based snoring is a common problem but easily avoided by using a small and virtually undetectable device called a nasal dilator to keep the nasal passages open. They are regarded as more effective than nasal strips that can be easily dislodged, and of course are very noticeable. A nasal dilator is hardly seen as it fits inside the nose rather than across it.

Small or collapsing nostrils can prevent you from successfully breathing through your nose. This encourages mouth breathing, and it is the air hitting the back of the throat that causes the snoring noise. By using simple nasal dilators you can easily remedy this problem and over the years the simple to use nasal dilator has proved to be one of the most popular and easy to use devices to enhance nasal breathing. This device is not just for snorers but can be used by anybody who suffers from nasal resistance.

This small low cost device is composed of two cone shapes that have a simple connector at the base that fits neatly inside the nostrils and keeps them open. It is comfortable to use and provides a clear passage for easier breathing and better sleep, and in doing so eliminates snoring. Whether you use them at home, or ‘just in case’ during rail and plane journeys – they’ll eliminate any snoring and breathing problems.

John Redfern